Fungi Species Mushroom Images
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Ramaria myceliosa

Ramaria myceliosa - Fungi species | sokos jishebi | სოკოს ჯიშები

Ramaria myceliosa

Sporocarp
Fruiting body short, 2.5-3.0 cm tall, tufted, astipitate, consisting of fascicled branches, weakly fused at the base, arising from rhizomorphs and a mycelial bed; branches cream-yellow in youth, becoming buff to pale-tan, sometimes honey-colored, maturing ochre-brown; apices pointed, often several to a branch tip, colored like the branches or lighter, later brown with exposure; main branches 2-3 mm in diameter, slightly compressed, pliant; odor mild, taste slightly bitter

Spores
Spores 4.5-5.5 (6.0) x 2.5-3.5 µm, spinulose, tear-shaped in face-view, elliptical in profile, inequilateral with a curved and flat side, inamyloid; spores ochre-brown in deposit.

Habitat
Gregarious, in arcs, or fairy rings in duff under conifers, especially coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), and Monterey cypress (Cupressus macrocarpa); fruiting from mid to late winter; common.

Edibility
Unknown.

Comments
Ramaria myceliosa is a short, cream to ochre-colored coral fungus, conspicuous for the arcs and rings it often forms in conifer duff. The lack of a central stipe, bitter taste, and development from a thick mycelial bed are additional characters that help separate it from similar coral fungi. These include Ramaria abietina, also common in arcs under conifers such as Monterey cypress, but more olivaceous, with a tendency to bruise bluish-green at the base; Lentaria pinicola, a short, well-branched, dull yellow to ochre coral found typically on dead conifer branches, e.g. Douglas fir, with smooth spores up to 9 microns long; Lentaria byssiseda, a small shrubby species found on woody debris with a short stipe, pinkish-tan branches, the tips lighter, occasionally greenish, and narrow, smooth spores up to 12 microns long. Ramaria myceliosa should also be compared with another small coral fungus common to the San Francisco Bay Area, Clavulina cristata. The latter fruits gregariously in pine duff, especially that of Monterey pine (Pinus radiata), but is paler, often cream-colored, and does not develop from a thick mycelial bed. Microscopically, its basidia are two-spored, the spores smooth, not spinulose.

Albatrellus caeruleoporus - Fungi Species Dendrocollybia racemosa - Fungi Species Hericium ramosum - Fungi Species
Calvatia pachyderma - Fungi Species Clavulinopsis laeticolor - Fungi Species Crepidotus fimbriatus - Fungi Species
Boletus abieticola - Fungi Species Ramaria rasilispora var. scatesiana - Fungi Species Clitocybe sclerotoidea - Fungi Species
Phylloporus rhodoxanthus - Fungi Species Calvatia fumosa: Handkea fumosa - Fungi Species Tricholomopsis rutilans - Fungi Species
Tremella aurantia - Fungi Species Nidula niveotomentosa - Fungi Species Phyllotopsis nidulans - Fungi Species
Boletus haematinus - Fungi Species Ramaria violaceibrunnea - Fungi Species Clavulina cinerea - Fungi Species
Tubaria confragosa - Fungi Species Agaricus semotus - Fungi Species Ramaria violaceibrunnea - Fungi Species
Pholiota terrestris - Fungi Species Agaricus bernardii - Fungi Species Collybia acervata: Gymnopus acervatus - Fungi Species

Copyright © 2012