Fungi Species Mushroom Images
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Coprinopsis ephemeroides

Coprinopsis ephemeroides - Fungi species | sokos jishebi | სოკოს ჯიშები

Coprinopsis ephemeroides

Pileus
Cap ellipsoid to bullet-shaped in youth, 4-7 mm tall x 2-3 mm wide, becoming obtuse-conic to convex, then plane, 7 to 12 mm expanded; margin at first incurved, then decurved, revolute in age; surface plicate-striate, covered with whitish granules which become pale-yellow and coarser at the disc; cap becoming ash-grey overall as the gills mature; context membranous, watery-grey, deliquescing in age; odor and taste mild.

Lamellae
Gills free, close, relatively narrow, 18-30 reaching the stipe, whitish, then grey, finally blackish, especially the edges; lamelullae in up to three-series.

Stipe
Stipe 2.5-5.0 cm long, 0.5-1.0 mm thick, equal except enlarged at the base and apex, fragile, tubular, hollow; surface glabrous to inconspicuously longitudinally striate (use hand lens), translucent-white; partial veil floccose-membranous, leaving a small, erect, fringed annulus medial or high on the stipe.

Spores
Spores 6.0-8.5 x 5.5-7.0 x 4.5-5.5 µm, subglobose to apple-shaped, or weakly pentagonal in face-view, elliptical in profile, smooth, germ pore central, dark-brown when mounted in water; spore print black.

Habitat
Solitary to clustered on horse and cow dung; fruiting throughout the year after moist periods; inconspicuous, occasionally common.

Edibility
Edibility unknown, insignificant.

Comments
Coprinopsis ephemeroides is a small dung-dwelling species recognized by a whitish, plicate-striate cap covered with cream-colored granules, yellowish at the disc. The presence of an annulus and creamy-yellow disc are important fieldmarks that help to separate it from the very similar Coprinus cordisporus. The latter, which often fruits with C. ephemeroides, lacks a ring, and has cap granules that tend to be tan to cinnamon-brown. Two additional species should be mentioned, Coprinus patouillardii and Coprinus cardiasporus. The former is regarded by some authors as conspecific with C. cordisporus, but may differ in slightly larger size, substrate preference (plant matter rather than dung), along with subtle microscopic differences. Coprinus cardiasporus, a name confusingly similar to C. cordisporus is also a small, dung dwelling species with a granulose cap. It is differentiated largely on microscopic grounds, the most obvious one being the spores which although heart-shaped in face-view are not angular or pentagonal as in the other species.

Clavulina cinerea - Fungi Species Tremellodendropsis tuberosa - Fungi Species Bird's Nest Fungus:Cyathus striatus - Fungi Species
Bird's Nest Fungus:Cyathus olla - Fungi Species Agaricus californicus - Fungi Species Brain Mushroom: Gyromitra esculenta - Fungi Species
Pulveroboletus ravenelii - Fungi Species Lactarius fallax - Fungi Species Pholiota aurivella - Fungi Species
Cheilymenia fimicola - Fungi Species Bovista californica - Fungi Species Peziza violacea - Fungi Species
Panaeolus campanulatus: Panaeolus papilionaceus - Fungi Species Lepiota castaneidisca - Fungi Species Rhodocollybia badiialba - Fungi Species
Ascobolus furfuraceus - Fungi Species Gomphidius glutinosus - Fungi Species Pyronema omphalodes - Fungi Species
Lactarius fallax - Fungi Species Nolanea holoconiota - Fungi Species Macrocystidia cucumis - Fungi Species
Russula amoenolens - Fungi Species Lepiota rubrotincta: Leucoagaricus rubrotinctus - Fungi Species Entoloma lividoalbum - Fungi Species

Copyright © 2012