Snake Species Dinosaur species

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

SONORAN LYRESNAKE
Trimorphodon lambda

SONORAN LYRESNAKE <br /> Trimorphodon lambda - snake species | gveli | გველი

SONORAN LYRESNAKE
Trimorphodon lambda

DESCRIPTION:
A medium sized (up to 1,026 mm or 40" in total length) light gray-brown to gray snake with a prominent dark brown lyre-shaped marking on the top of the head and a dark bar crossing the top of the head between the eyes. There are fewer than 30 (an average of 24) dark, orange-brown, jagged-edged blotches on the back.

Each dorsal blotch is outlined in pale gray and divided by a pale-gray central crossbar. Small dark additional markings are present on the sides of the body between the primary blotches. The head is broad posteriorly and is clearly distinct from the slender neck. The eyes are large and the pupils are vertically elliptical. The underside is light cream, yellow, or gray, occasionally with sporadic dark brown flecking. The scales are smooth.

DISTRIBUTION:
This snake is found across nearly all of southern Arizona and is likely found in most ranges in the western part of the state. Populations (possibly isolated) have been documented in the lower Grand Canyon, The Black Mountains of Mohave County, and the Kofa mountains of Yuma County. In Arizona this snake occurs at elevations ranging from just a few hundred feet above sea level to over 5,000'.

HABITAT:
It is found in a variety of biotic communities in Arizona including Sonoran, Mohave, and Chihuahuan desertscrubs, Semidesert Grassland, Interior Chaparral, Great Basin Conifer Woodland, Madrean Evergreen Woodland, and the lower reaches of Petran Montane Conifer Forest. It is usually encountered in rocky habitat above the flats. It frequents boulder-strewn hillsides, steep slopes, and rocky canyons.

BEHAVIOR:
This snake is nocturnal but it can be found basking in sun-warmed rock crevices on warm days in spring and fall. It hibernates during the cold months of late fall and winter. It is chiefly a ground-dweller but is capable of climbing. Although this snake usually does not bite when captured it is capable of injecting mild venom with enlarged, grooved teeth in the rear portion of its upper jaw. Bites to humans reportedly cause mild swelling and irritation.

DIET:
The Western Lyresnake uses its venom to subdue lizards, small mammals, bats, and birds. It also has the ability to constrict its prey.

REPRODUCTION:
A clutch of up to 20 eggs is laid in late summer.

REMARKS:
The Sonoran Lyresnake apparently hybridizes with the Chihuahuan Lyresnake (Trimorphodon vilkinsonii) in extreme southeastern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico.

Crotalus cerastes laterorepens - Colorado Desert Sidewinder | Snake Species  SPOTTED LEAF-NOSED SNAKE  <br />   Phyllorhynchus decurtatus | Snake Species NORTH AMERICAN RACER  Coluber constrictor | Snake Species
Hypsiglena (torquata) jani - Texas Nightsnake | Snake Species MILKSNAKE  Lampropeltis triangulum | Snake Species GREEN RATSNAKE  Senticolis triaspis | Snake Species
CHECKERED GARTERSNAKE <br /> Thamnophis marcianus | Snake Species Lampropeltis triangulum  - Milksnake | Snake Species Lampropeltis zonata zonata - St. Helena Mountain Kingsnake | Snake Species
Thamnophis elegans vagrans - Wandering Gartersnake | Snake Species Crotalus atrox - Western Diamond-backed Rattlesnake | Snake Species Diadophis punctatus arnyi - Prairie Ring-necked Snake | Snake Species
CHECKERED GARTERSNAKE <br /> Thamnophis marcianus | Snake Species Ramphotyphlops braminus - Brahminy Blindsnake | Snake Species Crotalus oreganus cerberus - Arizona Black Rattlesnake | Snake Species
MILKSNAKE  Lampropeltis triangulum | Snake Species WESTERN RATTLESNAKE <br />  Crotalus oreganus | Snake Species Coluber lateralis euryxanthus - Alameda Striped Racer | Snake Species
Pantherophis alleghaniensis - Eastern Ratsnake | Snake Species Sistrurus catenatus edwardsii - Desert Massasauga | Snake Species Crotalus atrox - Western Diamond-backed Rattlesnake | Snake Species

Copyright © 2012